Scholars

Photo of Jonas Meckling

Jonas Meckling

University of California, Berkeley
United States
Email: meckling [at] berkeley [period/dot] edu

Jonas Meckling is Associate Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where he leads the Energy and Environment Policy Lab. Jonas studies the politics of climate and clean energy policy. He published two books, the latest of which is Carbon Coalitions (MIT Press), and various journal articles, including in International Studies Quarterly, Governance, Nature Climate Change, Nature Energy, Science. Previously, Jonas served as Senior Advisor to the German Minister for the Environment, was a Research Fellow at Harvard University, and worked at the European Commission. He holds a Ph.D. in International Political Economy from the London School of Economics.

Jonas Meckling’s Website.

Publications

Strategic State Capacity: How States Counter Opposition to Climate Policy,”
Meckling J, Nahm J. (2021). Comparative Political Studies. July 16, 2021:00104140211024308.

Creative Learning and Policy Ideas: The Global Rise of Green Growth
Allan, B. B. and J. Meckling (2021). Perspectives on Politics. 

A Policy Roadmap for Negative Emissions Using Direct Air Capture
Meckling, J. and E. Biber (2021). Nature Communications 12: 2051.

​The Evolution of Ideas in Global Climate Policy
Meckling, J. and B. B. Allan (2020). Nature Climate Change 10: 434-438.

A New Path for U.S. Climate Politics: Choosing Policies That Mobilize Business for Decarbonization
Meckling, J. (2019). Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 685(1): 82-95.

The Politics of Technology Bans: Industrial Policy Competition and Green Goals for the Auto Industry
Meckling, J. and J. Nahm (2019). Energy Policy 126: 470-479.

Global Interdependence in Clean Energy Transitions
Meckling, J. and L. Hughes (2018). Business and Politics 4(20): 467-491. 

When Do States Disrupt Industries? Electric Cars and the Politics of Innovation
Meckling, J. and J. Nahm (2018). Review of International Political Economy 25(4): 505-529.

The Power of Process: State Capacity and Climate Policy
Meckling, J. and J. Nahm (2018). Governance 31(4): 741-757.
Winner, Evan J. Ringquist Best Paper Award, American Political Science Association

The Developmental State in Global Regulation: Economic Change and Climate Policy 
​Meckling, J. (2018). European Journal of International Relations 24(1): 58-81.

Who Wins in Renewable Energy? Evidence from Europe and the United States 
Kelsey, N. and J. Meckling (2018). Energy Research and Social Science 37: 65-73.

​Policy Sequencing toward Decarbonization
Meckling, J., Sterner, T., Wagner, G. (2017). Nature Energy 2(12): 918-922.

Winning Coalitions for Climate Policy: Green Industrial Policy Builds Support for Carbon Regulation
Meckling, J., Kelsey, N., Biber, E., Zysman, J. (2015). Science 349(6253): 1170-1171. 
Media coverage: VoxClimateWireGristScienceDailyYahooUtility DiveLegal Planet

Oppose, Support, or Hedge? Distributional Effects, Regulatory Pressure, and Business Strategy in Environmental Politics
Meckling, J. (2015). Global Environmental Politics 15(2): 19-37. Lead article.

The Globalization of Carbon Trading: Transnational Business Coalitions in Climate Politics
Meckling, J. (2011). Global Environmental Politics 11(2): 26-50.

Media Coverage

Jonas Meckling’s research on ideas in climate policy featured as cartoon by Eav Brennan

Economics from zero-sum to win-win (Nature Climate Change, April 20, 2020)

How Trump could undermine the US solar boom (The Conversation, September 20, 2017)

Q&A: Climate Change at the International Level (Breakthroughs, Fall, 2016)

Change We Must Believe In (The Berkeley Science Review, May 2, 2016)

The Gentle Giant’s Climate Problem (New York Observer, March 28, 2016)

Incentives to use more clean energy work best — study (ClimateWire, September 16, 2015)

Building Climate Coalitions (Legal Planet, September 11, 2015)

Want a global carbon price? Help out renewable companies first (Grist, September 11, 2015)

How to beat the climate crisis? Start with carrots (ScienceDaily, September 10, 2015)