Scholars

Matto Mildenberger

University of California, Santa Barbara
United States

Matto Mildenberger is an assistant professor of political science at the University of California Santa Barbara. His research explores the politics of climate change in the United States and around the world. His work has been published in the American Political Science Review, British Journal of Political Science, Nature Climate Change, Political Science Research Methods, Nature Energy and elsewhere. Mildenberger’s second book, Carbon Captured: How Labor and Business Control Climate Politics, is available from MIT Press.

In addition, at UCSB he co-runs the Energy and Environment Transitions (ENVENT) Lab, as well as fulfilling a role as Associate Deputy Editor at Climatic Change.

Publications

Michaël Aklin & Matto Mildenberger. “Prisoners of the wrong dilemma: Why distributive conflict, not collective action, characterizes the politics of climate change,”

Global Environmental Politics, Forthcoming, 2020.

Chad Hazlett & Matto Mildenberger. 2020. “Wildfire exposure increases pro-environment voting within Democratic but not Republican areas,”

American Political Science Review (July 2020).

Parrish Bergquist, Matto Mildenberger, & Leah C. Stokes. 2020. “How combining climate policy with economic and social reforms increases support for climate action,”

Environmental Research Letters 15(5): 054019 (May 2020).

Baobao Zhang & Matto Mildenberger. 2020. “Scientists’ political behaviors are not driven by individual-level government benefits,”

PLoS ONE 15(5): e0230961 (May 2020).

Matto Mildenberger, Peter Howe, & Chris Miljanich. 2019. “Households with solar installations are ideologically diverse and more politically active than their neighbors,”

Nature Energy 4: 1033-1039 (November 2019).

Matto Mildenberger & Dustin Tingley. 2019. “Beliefs about climate beliefs: The problem of second-order opinions in climate policymaking,”

British Journal of Political Science 49(4): 1279-1307 (October 2019).

Peter Howe, Jennifer Marlon, Matto Mildenberger, & Brittany Shield. 2019. “How will climate change shape climate opinions?

Environmental Research Letters 14(11): 113001 (October 2019).

Matto Mildenberger, Mark Lubell, & Michelle Hummel. 2019. “Local, spatially-resolved risk messaging can reduce climate concerns,”

Global Environmental Change. 55: 15-24 (March 2019).

Alexander Hertel-Fernandez, Matto Mildenberger, & Leah C. Stokes. 2019. “Legislative staff and representation in Congress,”

American Political Science Review. 113(1): 1-18 (November 2018).

Hanna Breetz, Matto Mildenberger, & Leah C. Stokes. 2018. “The political logics of clean energy transitions,”

Business and Politics 20(4): 492-522 (September 2018).

Baobao Zhang, Sander Van Der Linden, Matto Mildenberger, Peter Howe, Jennifer Marlon, & Anthony Leiserowitz. 2018. “Experimental effects of climate messages vary geographically,”

Nature Climate Change 8: 370-374 (April 2018).

Matto Mildenberger, Peter Howe, Jennifer Marlon, & Anthony Leiserowitz. 2017. “The spatial distribution of Republican and Democratic climate and energy beliefs at state and local scales,”

Climatic Change 145(3-4): 539-548 (November 2017).

Matto Mildenberger & Anthony Leiserowitz. 2017. “Public opinion about climate change: Is there an economy- environment trade-off?

Environmental Politics 26(5): 801-824 (May 2017).

Peter Howe., Matto Mildenberger, Jennifer Marlon, & Anthony Leiserowitz. 2015. “Geographic variation in opinions on climate change at state and local scales in the USA,”

Nature Climate Change 5: 596-603 (April 2015).

Media Coverage

Mildenberger’s research on the links between economic and environmental preferences discussed by John Schwartz. Americans See Climate as a Concern, Even Amid Coronavirus Crisis,” New York Times, May 19, 2020.

Mildenberger’s research on the Green New Deal discussed by the Atlantic. So Has the Green New Deal Won Yet? Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic, November 15, 2019.

Mildenberger’s research on wildfires and voting  featured in Californians close to wildfires are more likely to vote green,” The Economist, November 8, 2019.

Mildenberger’s research on Congress and climate lobbying discussed by Christopher Ingraham. Congress thinks that the public is way more conservative than it actually is. Deep-pocketed lobbyists are to blame, according to new research,” Washington Post, November 1, 2018.

Mildenberger’s research on Congress’ perception of the public. Congress Has No Clue What Americans Want,” Alexander Hertel-Fernandez, Matto Mildenberger, & Leah C. Stokes, October 31, 2018.

Mildenberger’s research on US climate attitudes featured in the New York Times. How Republicans Think About Climate Change,” Nadja Popovich & Livia Albeck-Ripka, New York Times, December 14, 2017.