Scholars

Photo of Wanyun Shao

Wanyun Shao

University of Alabama
United States
Email: wshao1 [at] ua [period/dot] edu

Dr. Wanyun Shao is currently an Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Alabama. She is a fellow for the National Science Foundation Enabling Next Generation of Hazards Researchers Fellowship Program for the 2019 – 2021 round. She was an Early-Career research fellow of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Gulf Research Program from 2017-2019. Her primary research interests are focused on human-environment interactions at various geographic scales and their policy implications. Specific interests include: human dimension of climate change, community resilience to environmental hazards, environmental policies and planning, and hazards and public health. Dr. Shao’s publications have appeared in numerous reputable international scholarly journals. For science communication effort, she has published several policy analysis articles for mass media outlets such as the Conversation, Vox, and the Washington Post.

Wanyun Shao’s Website.

Publications

Hao, F. and Shao, W. 2021. “What really drives the deployment of renewable energy? A global assessment of 118 countries.” Energy Research & Social Science  72, 101880.

Shao, W., Moftakhari, H., and Moradkhani, H. 2020. “Comparing public perceptions of sea level rise with scientific projections across five states of the U.S. Gulf Coast region” Climatic Change DOI: 10.1007/s10584-020-02893-1

Moftakhari, H., Shao, W., Moradkhani, H., AghaKouchak, A., Sanders, B., Matthew, R., Jones, S., and Orbinski, J. 2020Enabling incremental adaptation in disadvantaged communities: polycentric governance with a focus on non-financial capital can enable incremental adaptation in disadvantaged communities” Climate Policy DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2020.1833824

Shao, W. and Kam, J. 2020Retrospective and prospective evaluations of drought and flood” Science of the Total Environment 748, 141155.

Shao, W. and Hao, F. 2020 “Confidence in political leaders can slant risk perceptions of COVID-19 in a highly polarized environment.” Social Science & Medicine 261,113235.

Shao, W. and McCarthy, A. 2020Understanding Evangelical Protestant identity, religiosity, extreme weather, and American public perceptions of global warming, 2006-2016” Geographic Review, DOI: 10.1080/00167428.2019.1702427

Shao, W. and Hao, F. 2020Approval of political leaders can slant evaluation of political issues: evidence from public concern for climate change in the U.S.” Climatic Change 158(2), 201-212,10.1007/s10584-019-02594-4

Kim, S., Shao, W., and Kam, J. 2019Spatiotemporal patterns of US drought awareness” Palgrave Communications 5 (1), 107 DOI: 10.1057/s41599-019-0317-7

Shao, W., Feng, K., and Lin, N. 2019Predicting support for flood mitigation based on flood insurance purchase behavior” Environmental Research Letters DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/ab195a

Shao, W., Keim, B., Xian, S., and *O’Connor, R. 2019Flood hazards and perceptions – a comparative study of two cities in Alabama” Journal of Hydrology 569, 546-555.

Shao, W., Jackson, N., Ha, H., and N., Winemiller, T. 2019Assessing community vulnerability to floods and hurricanes in the U.S. Gulf Coast.” Disasters DOI: 10.1111/disa.12383

Shao, W., Gardezi, M., and Xian, S. 2018Examining the effects of objective hurricane risks and community resilience on risk perceptions of hurricanes at the county level in the U.S. Gulf Coast: An innovative approach” Annals of the American Association of Geographers. DOI: 10.1080/24694452.2018.1426436

Shao, W. 2017Weather, climate, politics or God? – determinants of American public opinions toward global warming” Environmental Politics. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2016.1223190

Shao, W., Xian, S., Lin, N., and Small, M. 2017 “A sequential model relating risk exposure, perception and public support for coastal flood adaptation measures” Water Research. DOI.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.05.072

Shao, W., Xian, S., Lin, N., Kunreuther, H., Jackson, N., and Goidel, K. 2017 “Understanding the effects of past flood events, perceived and estimated flood risks on individuals’ voluntary flood insurance purchase behaviors.” Water Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2016.11.021

Shao, W., Xian, S., Keim, B. D., Goidel, K., and Lin, N. 2017 “Understanding perceptions of changing hurricane strength along the U.S. Gulf Coast” International Journal of Climatology. DOI:10.1002/joc.4805

Shao, W., Garand, J.C., Keim, B. D., and Hamilton, L.C. 2016Science, scientists, and local weather: understanding mass attitudes toward global warming,” Social Science Quarterly. DOI: 10.1111/ssqu.12317

Shao, W. and Goidel, K. 2016, “Seeing is believing? – An examination of perceptions of local weather conditions and climate change among residents in the U.S. Gulf Coast” Risk Analysis. DOI:10.1111/risa.12571.

Shao, W., 2016, “Are actual weather and perceived weather the same?” Journal of Risk Research . 1-21.

Shao, W., Keim, B. D., Garand, J.C., and Hamilton, L.C., 2014, “Weather, climate, and the economy: explaining risk perceptions of global warming, 2001-2010,” Weather, Climate, and Society. 6, 119-134.

Media Coverage

Wanyun Shao’s research on extreme weather and belief in climate change discussed by Brad Plumer, “How Weather Gets Weaponized in Climate Change Messaging,” The New York Times, March 1, 2019.

Wanyun Shao’s research on perceptions of hurricanes discussed by Tim McDonnell, “The Life-or-Death Science of Evacuation Psychology,” Medium, September 14, 2018.