Natural Resources, Energy and Climate Obstruction in the Global South

Chairs: Ruth E. McKie De Montfort University, U.K. and Carlos R. S. Milani (Rio de Janeiro State University)

Global South countries across the globe have markedly different endowments and dependencies on different natural resources. Coal, hydropower, natural gas, and oil-dependent nations, as well as megadiverse and forest-rich countries differ in their histories, development trajectories and political structures. Indigenous peoples, activists, civil society organizations in the Global South face exceptionally difficult challenges when confronting states, international agencies and powerful national and transnational interest groups with massive firms headquartered in the Global North.  This working group will bring together scholars from different disciplines, methodologies, and geographical locations to focus on patterns of obstruction, exploitation, and repression in climate struggles in the Global South.

Some initial topics for this working group to explore:

  • What is the relevance of climate change in different political contexts of the Global South? How does it related to national social and economic agendas? What are the main players both nationally and at the subnational level? How does domestic politics relate to foreign policy agendas?
  • Are there institutional mechanisms and governance structures to discuss, implement and evaluate climate change policies? Who participates in them?
  • What are the main climate struggles and how do state and non-state actors interact (cooperation, conflict, repression, etc.)? When and under what conditions have climate movements and networks been able to influence policy-making? Have climate movements been coopted into governmental structures? Why and how? Do climate movements and networks connect with other social movements (race, gender, human rights)?
  • Are there relevant national climate denial networks? How are they organized? What are their transnational connections? What role does religion play in climate denial? Do scientists participate in these networks?

A first virtual meeting of the WG members and others who may be interested in joining it will discuss its format and structure, and collectively decide on future steps for the development of a collaborative research agenda.